TRIPE

Tripe is meat, got from edible linings of a ruminant. It could be goat, cow or any farm animal. Tripe is either bleached or unbleached. Bleached is when the tripe has been soaked in chlorine solution to remove impurities and worms or flukes.

There are four kinds of beef tripe:

  • The Rumen (flat tripe)
  • The Reticulum ( pocket tripe)
  • The omasum (bible).
  • Abomasum (reed) tripe is seen less frequently, owing to its glandular tissue content.

In Nigeria tripe meat is called shaki. It is used to cook many delicious dishes in Nigeria. You buy Tripe or shaki straight from the butcher and it is not bleached. l was at the abattoir the other day and I saw the butcher get the tripe off a slaughtered cow it was full of small pink worms. In Nigeria, tripe is not processed so one has to be very careful eating tripe meat. These small pink worms or fluke are found mainly in the hairy tripe.

Cleaning shaki before cooking is very important. To clean your shaki which is unbleached you need vinegar and salt. Rub the shaki with salt and rinse with vinegar Scrape the entire surface of the shaki. Repeat this process until it is clean. Finally rinse with water. Then cook the shaki in salted water for 10 minutes and throw out the water. The shaki is now ready to be used .

So the next time you order for shaki pepper soup ask yourself…….was it cleaned properly?

Womenpreneur

Access Bank Launches Womenpreneur Pitch-A-Ton 2019

As part of efforts to provide financial and business skills to female entrepreneurs, Access Bank Plc has announced the launch of its WomenpreneurPitch-A-Ton 2019, a capacity building initiative which will provide financial grants as well as mini-MBA trainings in conjunction with the International Finance Corporation (IFC, a member of the World Bank Group) for fifty winners.

The Womenpreneur Pitch-A-Ton is targeted at women above the age of 18 who have been in business for at least one year.

Speaking on the initiative, Ayona Aguele-Trimnell, Coordinator, W Initiative, Access Bank, stated that the Pitch-A-Ton is an expansion of the Womenpreneur Business Workshop, under the Bank’s women proposition, the W Initiative.

“In line with our value proposition as the No. 1 Bank of Choice for women in Nigeria, we are happy to announce the launch of the Womenpreneur Pitch-A-Ton 2019 which will provide up to N10 million in financial grants and a unique capacity building program aimed at empowering women entrepreneurs. The Pitch-A-Ton is designed as a 3-month programme incorporating pitching sessions and 3 weeks of mini-MBA trainings in collaboration with the IFC.

“Access Bank has been a leading advocate for women’s economic empowerment in Nigeria and this is the key motivation for the W Initiative which caters to women particularly in the areas of capacity building and creating networking opportunities” she added.

Explaining the mechanics for participation, Ada Udechukwu, Head, Women Banking said: “Interested persons who meet the criteria are required to fill an online application. The five hundred candidates selected from this pool will then send in a sixty seconds video pitch which will be screened by a credible panel of business experts to select fifty finalists.”

“As part of the graduation requirements, the fifty finalists will pitch their businesses, infusing learnings from the training and the winner will stand an opportunity to win N5 million in financial grants.” She added.

As a leading commercial bank in Nigeria, Access Bank has made significant investments aimed at enhancing growth in the Small and Medium-size  Enterprise sector. The Bank is also a major advocate for women in business through innovative offerings like the W Power Loan, a discounted financing at 15% interest per annum, for women to grow their business as well as other Business Support Services.

The Womenpreneur Pitch-A-Ton is the first women-in-business support initiative of its kind in the industry.

RESTAURANTS in Owerri

I am a food lover, and l love eating out. I was born and raised in Owerri and I have tried different restaurants in Owerri and here are my top 3. If you are new in Owerri and want to eat , I highly recommend these restaurants. You can be sure the meals are freshly prepared.

Hungry Man

Hungry Man is located at Musa Yar’ Adua Way, New Owerri, Owerri. The restaurant has a seating capacity of approximately 50 people. i enjoy eating there because of its affordability, delicious food and the beautiful setting. Their menus are mouth watering. A plate of their food is about N2500 -N3500 including water and fruits. The have snail,chicken,dry fish,stockfish,goat meat and fresh fish. Their soups are to die for and best of all their meals are prepared from fresh organic ingredients. I can not help but to look around at the restaurant’s attractive ambiance while am eating I am eating. I highly recommend going there and sampling their services

MAMA G

Mama G is located at Lake Nwaebere street Owerri. This restaurant serves only local dishes. The food is like home cooked meal. The environment is cozy and kid-friendly. Their dishes feature local flavours which you should try out. You have to be there by 12pm or you won’t get food cos once the food is out its sold out by 2pm. I love their nsala soup.

JEVINIK

This is another restaurant l go to eat. A nice clean environment . Also kid-friendly. I recommend the chef’s special for the day. A plate of food there is about 2000 -2500 depending on your order. Jevinik is located at 19 Umez Eronini Street, Ikenegbu layout, Owerri.The have chicken,dry fish,stockfish,goat meat and fresh fish. Jevinik is the only place in Owerri to get seafood soup. The have well-trained waiters.

Garden egg fries

Who says fries can only be made from potatoes? Not me. I have a new recipe made from garden eggs. Called afufa, anara or mkpuru ofe by the Igbos and Obe-Igba by the Yorubas. Solanum melongena or garden egg as we know it, is a highly valued vegetable and constituent of the African food. Culturally, garden egg is said to represent fertility and blessing – this explains why it is common to find it being served during wedding ceremonies in some communities across the African continent.

Ingredients:

  • 3 medium garden egg peeled, ends removed
  • 1 cup breadcrumbs
  • 1/2 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp. onion powder
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. pepper(optional)
  • 3 egg whites

Directions:

  • Cut garden eggs into French-fry shaped spears.
  • In a medium-large bowl, combine breadcrumbs and seasonings.
  • Place garden eggs in another large bowl. Top with egg whites and toss in breadcrumbs to coat.
  • One at a time, shake garden egg to remove excess egg, and lightly coat with breadcrumb mixture.
  • Fry for 1 min and serve with any dip of your choice

Recipe note:

You can bake it in the oven for 10 minutes.

Garden egg fries

Who says fries can only be made from potatoes? Not me. I have a new recipe made from garden eggs. Called afufa, anara or mkpuru ofe by the Igbos and Obe-Igba by the Yorubas. Solanum melongena or garden egg as we know it, is a highly valued vegetable and constituent of the African food. Culturally, garden egg is said to represent fertility and blessing – this explains why it is common to find it being served during wedding ceremonies in some communities across the African continent.

Ingredients:

  • 3 medium garden egg peeled, ends removed
  • 1 cup breadcrumbs
  • 1/2 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp. onion powder
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. pepper(optional)
  • 3 egg whites

Directions:

  • Cut garden eggs into French-fry shaped spears.
  • In a medium-large bowl, combine breadcrumbs and seasonings.
  • Place garden eggs in another large bowl. Top with egg whites and toss in breadcrumbs to coat.
  • One at a time, shake garden egg to remove excess egg, and lightly coat with breadcrumb mixture.
  • Fry for 1 min and serve with any dip of your choice

Recipe note:

You can bake it in the oven for 10 minutes.

Cocoyam Dumplings

While visiting Italy last year l came across this cook book by Mama Agata and her Gnocchi di Mama Agatha caught my attention. I made a mental note to recreate it when l get to Nigeria. A year afterwards l have perfected this recipe with Cocoyam. Cocoyams are plants with edible roots. Here in Nigeria we use them as thickner for soup ,it is roasted ,boiled and eaten with Palm oil.


Ingredients

  • 7 cocoyams
  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp salt

Directions

  • Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Peel cocoyams and add to pot. Cook until tender about 30 minutes. Drain, cool and mash with a fork or potato masher.
  • Combine mashed cocoyam, flour and eggs in a large bowl. Knead until dough forms a ball. Shape small portions of the dough into long On a floured surface, cut into half-inch pieces.
  • Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Drop in gnocchi and cook for 3 to 5 minutes or until gnocchi have risen to the top; drain and serve

Recipe notes

  • To get the shapes you have to have a gnocchi board. I do not have a gnocchi board so l used a fork. You can still cut it and not make any indentations.
  • I served mine with minced meat sauce.

Butter Cookies with a twist

So, I was browsing through some biscuit recipes on Pinterest and I came across this one by Brown Eyed Baker from http://www.browneyedbaker.com. It was simple and easy to follow so I decided to make it… but l added a twist to it….instead of vanilla I used uziza seeds. Uziza (piper guineense) is an African Plant; it has two parts the leaves and the seed. Uziza is a popular local spice mainly used in Nigerian dishes.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 250g salted butter
  •  1/2 cup granulated sugar
  •  3 tsp uziza
  •  1egg
  •  2 cups all-purpose flour
  • Uziza for sprinkling (optional)

DIRECTIONS:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

Beat the butter and sugar on medium speed until combined and fluffy 1 to 2 minutes. Add the egg and uziza and beat for 1 minute or until combined.

Reduce the speed to low and gradually add the flour until combined.

Transfer the dough to a piping bag fitted with a large open star tip. Pipe the dough into 2-inch circles on the parchment paper . Sprinkle with uziza. ( the swirls are not perfect? dont worry mine isn’t either).

Bake, one pan at a time, until light golden brown 15 to 17 minutes. Allow to cool completely before storing or serving

Recipe Note:

You can substitute butter for cooking margarine. The original recipe called for unsalted butter and a quater teaspoon of salt but l omitted the salt because l used salted butter( it’s not easy getting butter around here so l made use of what l saw at the store).

I did not blend the uziza to fine dust I used the pulse button on my blender to create the texture l want. I like the bits and small chunks.

Beans combo

My daughter hates beans so I try to spice it up each time l cook it, by far this is the best I have come up with… and she loves it so l decided to share it. I call it beans combo because it is a combination of foods.

Ingredients

  • 3 cups of Beans( white kidney beans)
  • 1 cup of fresh corn
  • 1kg mackerel
  • 1 cup of pre-soaked cassava flakes(Abacha)
  • 2 wraps of oil bean seeds(ugba)
  • 3 TBsp of ground crayfish
  • 5 TBsp red oil
  • 1 TBsp pepper
  • 1 medium sized onion
  • Salt to taste

Method

Wash the fish and season. Let it marinate in the seasoning for 10 mins and fry.

Pick and wash the beans . Bring to boil for about 10 minutes. Strain and throw out the water( I do that because of the pesticides they use in preserving beans) continue cooking for 25mins.

Add sliced onions, crayfish ,pepper and corn, allow to boil for 20mins.

Add the pre-soaked cassava flakes and oil bean seed. Add the red oil and salt to taste… sprinkle with the scent leaves.